Monthly Archives: May 2011

The Guardian and David Cameron’s Bookshelf

On a week when questions of personal privacy have been flooding the press, the Guardian managed to shamelessly crane its neck into Downing Street through an open window. This open window, of course, was not of the conventional variety and instead came in the shape of a photograph – posted on the Official Whitehouse Flickr […]

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Book Review – The Atmosphere of Heaven by Mike Jay

Little Green Bag On the second anniversary of the Storming of the Bastille, 14 July 1791, a rampaging mob descended on the Birmingham home of Joseph Priestley with the aim of roasting him alive. Among King & Country patriots, Priestley was infamous. He was one of a dangerous set of idealistic dissenters, liable to spark […]

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W Somerset Maugham and Malcolm Muggeridge: the 1954 BBC interview

One obvious problem with digital media is that there is so much of it. It’s amusing and bewildering to see people linking to the number of articles that they do on Twitter every day. It leaves me with the image of a scavenger combing a third-world rubbish tip, stopping periodically and hoisting an object triumphantly […]

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Kingsley Amis – The Hangover

‘Dixon was alive again. Consciousness was upon him before he could get out of the way; not for him the slow, gracious wandering from the halls of sleep, but a summary, forcible ejection. He lay sprawled, too wicked to move, spewed up like a broken spider-crab on the tarry shingle of the morning. The light […]

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Scribble, scribble, scribble

Dr. Johnson on Richard Savage’s preoccupation with editing: ‘A superstitious Regard to the Correction of his Sheets was one of Mr Savage’s Peculiarities; he often altered, revised, recurred to his first Reading or Punctuation, and again adopted the Alteration; he was dubious and irresolute without End, as on a Question of the last Importance, and […]

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